7 ways to cope with your child’s sensory processing challenges

child with sensory processing challenges

Some children have trouble processing the information they take in through their five senses.            

Bright Heart

Bright Heart

Sensory processing challenges present in different ways. Here we offer 7 tips to make it easier for you and your child.

7 ways to cope with your child's sensory processing challenges

Some children have trouble processing the information they take in through their five senses. Things like too much noise, crowds and even “scratchy” clothes can cause them to become anxious, uncomfortable, overwhelmed or even aggressive. That can lead to actions that leave you mystified as a parent. Here are seven tips to help you cope.

child with sensory processing challenges

1. Understand the difference between 'mountains' and 'molehills'

As is the case with all children, not every misdemeanour by a child with sensory processing challenges ought to be punished. There are times when their actions merely stem from a need to experience something in their environment the only way they know how. For example, spitting their food out or playing with it at the table is often the best way for them to make sense of new tastes and textures. This should be treated as a proverbial molehill. Throwing a plate at someone, however, because they don’t like their food is more of a mountain and requires action on your part as the parent. The key worth bearing in mind is that if their behaviour can hurt themselves or someone else, it is recommended that you intervene. If not, rather help them work through the situation and always try to provide them with a variety of options.

2. Encourage play in a variety of sensory bins at least 5-6 times per week

Encouraging your child’s regular exposure to a variety of sensory experiences can assist him or her in overcoming or better managing their challenges. This can be done at home or under the guidance of an occupational therapist, for example, who specialises in assisting children with sensory processing difficulties.

3. Acknowledge to your child and yourself that when they experience sensory challenges, they are not simply being difficult

Acknowledge that this is a real thing that is causing them real pain or discomfort. When you do, it will give you more patience and empathy and create more ease for your child, knowing that they are accepted despite the difficulties that they feel and express

4. Yoga, breathing and meditation

Using these tools in educational settings is becoming more mainstream and with good reason.  Moving slowly through a yoga sequence can provide calming stimulation to the vestibular system, the proprioceptive system, and the tactile system, improving self-regulation for a child with sensory processing challenges. Meditation helps calm the sympathetic nervous system (fight or flight) while activating the parasympathetic nervous system (resting and digesting).

5. When dealing with aggression related to sensory processing challenges, remember it’s not because of bad parenting

It’s not your fault. The most important thing you can do is have a team of people to help, from a trusted family doctor, to an occupational therapist that you trust. Believe that it gets better. Remind yourself how much you absolutely love your child and pick yourself up to fight another day, because your child desperately needs you to.

6. Create a chill-out zone for emotional times

Keep this space calm, clutter-free, quiet and dim. Some children might favour a bottom bunk, the corner of a closet, even under a desk or table. You could even use a child-sized tent or teepee for younger children. Items you may wish to include in this calming zone include: favourite books, noise-cancelling headphones, sensory toys, a beanbag chair and/or weighted blanket. The most important factor to note here is that the chill-out zone must remain a place of refuge for your child, not a place of punishment.

7. Create as much consistency and predictability in their daily routine as possible.

Look for patterns. Use check-lists for your child as a visual cue to create routine and give them a sense of knowing what to expect. Certain times of day are often more challenging than others. Break down a situation or routine (for example a homework plan) into simple tasks on a whiteboard. This can help prevent your child from becoming overwhelmed.

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Is your child ready for their GCSE exams?

exam revision

Good planning and structure can reduce exam anxiety with GCSEs fast approaching.                                                          

Bright Heart

Bright Heart

Preparing for GCSE exams need not be an anxious time with appropriate planning and structure.

Is your child ready for their GCSE exams?

It can be scary how quickly the year flies by, with the days already feeling longer as we approach summer.

 

For many children, GCSE exams are fast approaching. With only a few months to go before exams start in May, it is important that students have a revision plan in place. Asking for help is not a sign of weakness. Instead, helping your child find the tools to become self-sufficient in their learning is a sensible approach.

exam revision
While GCSE revision can appear daunting, it can be more easily achieved with a structured plan.

At Bright Heart, our experienced and trained tutors can design bespoke plans to give your child all the necessary tools to create structured study timetables and adopt a good work ethic. Our more nurturing approach to tuition is also sensitive to their emotional well-being.

Our tutors cover a variety of subjects (in addition to English, Maths and Science) for many different students; ranging from students in school just looking for a little help and encouragement, to children who are homeschooled or who have special educational needs (SEN). With one-to-one tuition beneficial to students of all abilities, we can help your child realise their potential. Year 11 students who receive this level of personalised tuition tend to perform better in class and also retain more information.

teenager prepared for GCSE exams
Revision is a work habit that can be learned and which eases anxiety.

GCSEs can be an anxious time for students and parents alike. An integral part of our heart-based tuition involves preparing our students emotionally for facing exams. This can be a hugely stressful time for 15 and 16-year-olds. Bright Heart’s nurturing approach helps to build confidence and self-esteem so our pupils can tackle the exams with reduced levels of stress. Our blend of structured planning, tailored tuition and self-development through embodying a holistic approach provides our students the tools needed to achieve longer-term success.

Your child can benefit from your encouragement and understanding as well as the support of a patient tutor at this often anxious time.

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” – Nelson Mandela

Get in touch to discuss how Bright Heart’s unique heart-based approach can help your child with their GCSE preparation.

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