Lessons learned during lockdown

parental support and presence

We look at how lockdown has impacted our lives and the important lessons learned during this time.            

Bright Heart

Bright Heart

How many of these lessons learned under lockdown can you relate to?

Lessons learned under lockdown

As parents, our hearts’ desire is to see our children reach their potential and perform at their best. This could be on the sports field, in artistic pursuits or in the classroom.

Lockdown added extra stress to many of our lives by placing the burden of our children’s education squarely on our shoulders via homeschooling. For some, that meant tears, tantrums and unforeseen pressure.

In this blog, we highlight 5 key lessons learned during lockdown.

1. Emotional well-being before academic performance

One of the main lessons learned during lockdown was the importance of supporting our children emotionally. This meant putting an emphasis on their well-being before fretting over their academic progress.  Sometimes a hug and a few words of reassurance at the right time can spare tears over a looming assignment and keep things running smoothly. 

Don’t be shy to step back for a moment and take a break with your child. This creates room for connection before returning to school-related tasks.

Physical and emotional reassurance may be the best academic support you can give your child

2. The power of routine

It may have been challenging for you to manage work responsibilities, household chores and the needs of your family and children. Especially when still finding time for essential exercise. We heard the collective cries of ‘What day is it?’ on more than one occasion.

Whilst in the throes of chaos, there is a lot to be said for creating and maintaining routine. Daily meals at regular times, regular bed times, daily exercise and daily work / schoolwork during set times help to keep the family ship on a steady course.

Reinforce stability through the power of maintaining routine

3. There is no shame in asking for help

Lockdown has been a source of stress. It has negatively impacted on the mental health of adults and children in the UK and globally. Some reports have cited up to 65 per cent of children struggling with boredom and feelings of isolation during lockdown .

For you and your children, looking after your mental health is imperative. There is no shame in asking for help. A number of not-for-profit organisations have made their services and additional COVID-19 resources available (see our blog post on Your child’s mental health during times of stress).

parental support and presence
Don't hesitate to get help for yourself or child should you feel it's needed

4. Managing disappointment

Whether we have had to cancel travel plans, or had exciting events such as birthday parties, weddings or concerts postponed or shifted online, we have all needed to come to terms with disappointment. This can be especially challenging for children and teenagers. Parents can intervene, however, to help them handle disappointment in a positive manner.

Teach them that there are almost always alternatives available, if they are only prepared to look for them with an open mind.  Also, a postponed holiday or event is something that can be looked forward to.

Dealing with disappointment can be a catalyst for developing resilience

5. Being present is enough

Parents are the most important people in a child’s life. No matter what the circumstances, as long as a parent is nearby, a child feels safe.  A child doesn’t really need you to play with her / him all the time. Instead, they value you being around for them to feel secure.

Our children don’t really need lots of toys to be happy. Simpler activities are still entertaining. For example, try gardening, hopscotch or skipping with a rope, board games, cooking or other household chores. Remember, your presence is what your children crave and need most.

Give your child your undivided attention and even mundane chores have value for them.

Any advice or tips you could offer others to learn from? We would love to hear about it on our Facebook page, or feel free to get in touch directly with any questions.


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Your child’s mental health during times of stress

boy with anxiety

We bring attention to some warning signs relating to mental health. This is particular important at this time.    

Bright Heart

Bright Heart

In time of stress, mental health is increasingly important. We consider some warning signs.

Your child’s mental health during times of stress

According to The Guardian, fewer young people are receiving help with mental health issues. This is despite levels of anxiety and depression having risen sharply in the under 18 age group. 

Reasons include mental health services being suspended or restricted and a lack of in-person engagement. The closure of schools – a first point of referral for distressed children – has certainly not helped.  

an unhappy girl doing homework
Learning and engagement is strongly affected by one's mental and emotional state.

Lockdowns have negatively impacted many children

Almost one in four children living under COVID-19 lockdowns, social restrictions and school closures are dealing with feelings of anxiety, with many at risk of lasting psychological distress, including depression. In recent surveys by Save the Children of over 6000 children and parents in the US, Germany, Finland, Spain and the UK, up to 65 per cent of the children struggled with boredom and feelings of isolation.”  

Reliefweb International, 7 May 2020

The pandemic has turned the lives of millions of children and young people upside down. Many young people are finding it hard to cope with isolation, a loss of routine, anxiety about the future, a disruption to their education, and in some cases difficult or traumatic experiences at home.”

Emma Thomas of YoungMinds, a leading UK not-for-profit championing mental health for young people

boy with anxiety
We all have times when we need to talk to someone. This is especially true for children.

The impact of COVID-19 on children's mental health

While it has been a challenging time for parents, children have felt the effects of social distancing and isolation with far-reaching effects. The British Psychological Society, together with more than thirty other organisations, have written an open letter to the Government. This letter was urging them to limit the long-term impact of the pandemic on young people’s mental health.

What should parents consider for their child's mental health?

Previously, we covered the importance of planning an active day in our homeschooling tips for parents and the importance of physical activity. Eating regular meals, getting sufficient sleep and limiting screen time go together with this.

Good mental health is a much-needed foundation for learning.

However, you may find your children require additional support.  

Some warning signs to be aware of in your child’s behaviour that could indicate impaired mental health can be remembered by using the acronym MASK:

M – Mood

They get irritable, argumentative or aggressive towards you. They may blame you if things go wrong. They can also become withdrawn.

A – Actions

They may experience changes in eating and sleeping patterns. Look out for any signs of bullying, over- or under-eating or self-harm.

S – Social

They suddenly appear especially bored, lonely or withdrawn or they start to get into trouble. Losing interest in friends and other things they liked to do or loss of interest and motivation with schoolwork are common warning signs.

K - Keep talking

Refusing or being reluctant to talk about how they’re feeling is common. But keep listening and ask how they are feeling. When they do open up, make sure they know there’s someone there who really cares.

Please note that these symptoms are by no means diagnostic in nature. Professional advice is always preferable, especially if you have any doubt as to what may be causing the change in your child’s behaviour.

Attention and active listening go a long way in making sure your child does not slip under the radar.

Where can I get extra help for my child's mental health?

Fortunately, there is plenty of help at hand and we recommend reaching out to the team at YoungMinds where you will find many resources and professional support available.

Other sources of support include:

The NSPCC and the Mental Health Foundation.

We are also here to help with any learning issues relating to anxiety and social and emotional mental health. Feel free to get in touch with one of our experienced directors to discuss your needs. We offer a free consultation and a free trial lesson to help build rapport.


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