Having a SEN-friendly Summer in London during COVID-19

We look at summer activities for children and young adults with autism, learning disabilities and other special educational needs.

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Bright Heart

Enjoy this selection of SEN-friendly activities for this Summer in London.

Having a SEN-friendly Summer in London
during COVID-19

Finding SEN-friendly activities for summer for children and young adults with autism, learning disabilities and other special educational needs (SEN) in and around London can be a challenge. During the pandemic this is even trickier than usual. We have done a round-up on some of the events and outings that you may still enjoy at this time with your family. Here is a selection of our favourites:

Online Summer School

Song, laughter and dance are available through the Mousetrap Theatre Projects' Online Summer School.

Sing, dance, and laugh your way with your children by participating in theatre and dance-themed #EveryHomeATheatre challenges from Mousetrap Theatre Projects. Revisit past challenges or join their Online Summer School here. There are 90-minute drama workshops available on Zoom daily.  Age groups from 7 to 19 are catered for.

A SEN-friendly Cinema Outing – because it’s always better on the big screen!

Autism-friendly outings for the whole family at the Odeon Cinema are a must-do.

The Autism Friendly Screenings at Odeon Cinema are ideal for families with a child with special educational needs. Here you can all enjoy a film in an environment designed for people with Asperger’s Syndrome or who are on the autism spectrum. Low lights are left on inside the auditorium during the film and the soundtrack is quieter than it would be in a regular film screening. Another difference is that there are no trailers screened before the main film at AFS screenings.  Audience members are also not restricted from moving around, making a noise or taking a break in the middle of the film screening. Some Odeon cinemas reopened on the 4th of July and protocols are in place to ensure that they offer a safe cinema experience. Enquire on their website

Museum of London – Listen and Learn from Home

Find some 'screen-free' activities for your child to enjoy while the Listen and Learn at Home from the Museum of London.

Outings may provide relief from cabin-fever but some of you may feel more comfortable with stay-home practices at the moment. However, you can still have enjoyable cultural experiences with the family. The Museum of London is always a wonderful outing in this regard. During the pandemic, the museum has made a number of virtual tours and other activities available.  You might feel encouraged to know that some of these are also ‘screen-free’.  Find out more here.

SEN-friendly learning with 3D objects

Learning in 3D for students with SEN is available at the Museum of London

Also at the Museum of London, it is possible for students with learning difficulties to still get up close and personal with objects in 3D.  A range of 3D objects with resources designed specifically for students with special educational needs and disabilities is available

Historic Royal Palaces

Learning about history can be fun with the free resources available from Historic Royal Palaces.

For lots of ideas and resources online to help your children continue exploring history and the wider world without having to step outside the front door during the summer can be found here.

These five top history resources will keep your kids learning AND smiling while you’re staying home together. Parental participation is optional.  

SEN-Friendly Outdoor Wild Play

Outdoor wild play can be enjoyed by a variety of ages and is especially helpful for children with special educational needs.

Allowing your child to participate in outdoor activities such as these outdoor games, woodland crafts, survival skills (including shelter-building and tracking among others), have been shown to be helpful for a variety of special needs, including:

The team at Outdoor Wild Play welcomes children with special needs to their sessions. They have a strict COVID-19 protocol in place for health and safety reasons. Contact them directly to discuss which venues are available and to answer any further questions you may have.

What has been your experience as a parent of a child with SEN? We would love to hear about it on our Facebook page, or feel free to get in touch directly to chat.


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Supporting Parents of Children with SEN

Parenting is not always easy and lockdown has added to the challenges. We look at some SEN support available.

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Bright Heart

Community support is available for parents. It helps to share challenges and to support each other.

Supporting Parents of Children with SEN

Parenting is not always easy and lockdown has certainly added to the challenges. Many parents are finding it a struggle to balance work, their children’s homeschooling and the need to make some time for themselves. This can be especially difficult when you have a child with special needs. Parents of children with SEN are therefore sometimes in need of additional support.

Help is at hand. We’ve done a short round up on some options available.

For Parents

  • Get in touch with SENDIASS in London. This service aims to help parents, children and young people and professionals work together to provide the best possible support to children and young people with SEN.
  • Connect with SEN Talk Parent Support Facebook group which supports the whole family. This group champions neurodiversity for children and young people, families and the wider community. They are based in Battersea, London
  • Get in touch with Merton and Southwest London Dyslexia Association through Wandsworth THRIVE. This organisation provides advice and information for individuals with dyslexia and their families and carers. For a £10 membership fee, the group also offers advice to parents about their child's dyslexia and an advisor who can attend school/council meetings to discuss their child's special educational needs.
  • Ealing parents of children with ADHD in need of a support group can contact Wendy to find out more about the drop in surgery/ coffee morning twice a month at the Grange Children's Centre in Ealing. For more details contact Wendy on 07970 698 739
Support is available in the community for parents of a child with special needs.

For Dads

We recognise that dads are not always the first person in the family to reach out for help. With this in mind, we have included some options aimed specifically at dads.

  • Take 5 and Chat is a parenting additional needs support group on Facebook (it also has a website). It specifically helps dads of children with SEN. Dads are able to talk through any of their difficulties here.
  • Alternatively you could get help from a non-profit or church-based organisation such as Who Let The Dads Out.
  • Connect with Autism Dads Support Facebook group which has around 3,000 members specifically for dads and male carers of children and young adults with autism.
  • Dads who are in need of support with a child or children with ASD in Hounslow, reach out to this Autism Dads Support group in your area.
There are many dads in similar situations. Connecting and sharing helps.

Giving back to the community

Being able to lean on the expertise, experience and resources of others who work with children with special needs and their families can make a real difference.  You may find you need a combination of different types of support, from therapy or counselling, to familial support for practical care-giving, to educational support from occupational therapists or tutors.

As you progress and gain a sense of feeling supported from within your community, don’t lose sight of how you initially felt before you received the help you needed.  Try to find ways to give back where you can. To help manage the pressures of special needs parenting, we should be willing to reach out and accept help. We should also be prepared to offer it.  It is in community that we can make progress, knowing that we don’t journey alone.

You may find your community within a Facebook Group you belong to, a book club, a church or sports club, your family circle or a non-profit organisation you’ve dealt with.

Don't hesitate to get help for yourself or child should you feel it's needed

What has been your experience as a parent of a child with SEN? We would love to hear about it on our Facebook page, or feel free to get in touch directly to chat.


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Lessons learned during lockdown

parental support and presence

We look at how lockdown has impacted our lives and the important lessons learned during this time.            

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Bright Heart

How many of these lessons learned under lockdown can you relate to?

Lessons learned under lockdown

As parents, our hearts’ desire is to see our children reach their potential and perform at their best. This could be on the sports field, in artistic pursuits or in the classroom.

Lockdown added extra stress to many of our lives by placing the burden of our children’s education squarely on our shoulders via homeschooling. For some, that meant tears, tantrums and unforeseen pressure.

In this blog, we highlight 5 key lessons learned during lockdown.

1. Emotional well-being before academic performance

One of the main lessons learned during lockdown was the importance of supporting our children emotionally. This meant putting an emphasis on their well-being before fretting over their academic progress.  Sometimes a hug and a few words of reassurance at the right time can spare tears over a looming assignment and keep things running smoothly. 

Don’t be shy to step back for a moment and take a break with your child. This creates room for connection before returning to school-related tasks.

Physical and emotional reassurance may be the best academic support you can give your child

2. The power of routine

It may have been challenging for you to manage work responsibilities, household chores and the needs of your family and children. Especially when still finding time for essential exercise. We heard the collective cries of ‘What day is it?’ on more than one occasion.

Whilst in the throes of chaos, there is a lot to be said for creating and maintaining routine. Daily meals at regular times, regular bed times, daily exercise and daily work / schoolwork during set times help to keep the family ship on a steady course.

Reinforce stability through the power of maintaining routine

3. There is no shame in asking for help

Lockdown has been a source of stress. It has negatively impacted on the mental health of adults and children in the UK and globally. Some reports have cited up to 65 per cent of children struggling with boredom and feelings of isolation during lockdown .

For you and your children, looking after your mental health is imperative. There is no shame in asking for help. A number of not-for-profit organisations have made their services and additional COVID-19 resources available (see our blog post on Your child’s mental health during times of stress).

parental support and presence
Don't hesitate to get help for yourself or child should you feel it's needed

4. Managing disappointment

Whether we have had to cancel travel plans, or had exciting events such as birthday parties, weddings or concerts postponed or shifted online, we have all needed to come to terms with disappointment. This can be especially challenging for children and teenagers. Parents can intervene, however, to help them handle disappointment in a positive manner.

Teach them that there are almost always alternatives available, if they are only prepared to look for them with an open mind.  Also, a postponed holiday or event is something that can be looked forward to.

Dealing with disappointment can be a catalyst for developing resilience

5. Being present is enough

Parents are the most important people in a child’s life. No matter what the circumstances, as long as a parent is nearby, a child feels safe.  A child doesn’t really need you to play with her / him all the time. Instead, they value you being around for them to feel secure.

Our children don’t really need lots of toys to be happy. Simpler activities are still entertaining. For example, try gardening, hopscotch or skipping with a rope, board games, cooking or other household chores. Remember, your presence is what your children crave and need most.

Give your child your undivided attention and even mundane chores have value for them.

Any advice or tips you could offer others to learn from? We would love to hear about it on our Facebook page, or feel free to get in touch directly with any questions.


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9 nifty activities to survive lockdown with your children

fun coloured window with hearts

It can be tricky to keep children entertained and focus on one’s own work. Here are some fun activities! 

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Bright Heart

Need inspiration to keep your children entertained during lockdown? Here’s a roundup of 9 fun & easy activities.

9 nifty activities to survive lockdown with your children

The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in an almost global lockdown to slow the spread of the virus. Schools are largely closed and many of us are working from home. This means that we’re spending a lot of time with our partners and/or children. It can be tricky to keep children entertained and focus on one’s own work. It’s easy to fall into the trap of letting children watch TV or scroll online for hours on end, but the little ones in particular are bound to become restless as the days go by.

Below are some fun activities you can do with your younger children (or allow your older children to do themselves) during lockdown:

Lockdown Idea #1

Let your children paint numbers 1-1 on ordinary garden stones (or you can use prepared coloured cards).  Hide the numbers 1 to 10…around the garden or around the house and let them play Number Fun Hide ‘n Seek! (You can give younger children clues as to where to look that correspond to each number, for example:  “1 is hidden in or near an appliance that we have one of (e.g. the fridge) 2 is hidden in a room with two beds in it…” etc. ). This will also be a good practice for an Easter egg hunt for Sunday the 12th of April.

Lockdown Idea #2

This will keep the kids calm for a little while – invite them to read or listen to an audio book in an easy, home-made under table hammock using blankets or sheets knotted above a sturdy tabletop as shown above.

Lockdown Idea #3

Have a Lockdown Disco one evening – print tickets and invite your family to have some fun while you play DJ. Suggest each member of the family makes a half-hour playlist, dim the lights and get your groove on! Or try online dance classes and learn a routine.

Lockdown Idea #4

Take virtual tours

The museums and art galleries may be closed but if your teenager wants to expand their horizons, there are now virtual tours of thousands of the world’s most important museums, including the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and the Guggenheim in New York. The tours are so good it’s like you are actually wandering through the corridors and you can zoom in to view any masterpieces you fancy. Look up the museums’ websites for more details. 

One such example is the National Videogame Museum. Your child can create a Pixel Art character or design their own arcade cabinet with these fun activities to play at home: https://www.thenvm.org/nvm-at-home

Lockdown Idea #5

fun coloured window with hearts

Order tissue paper from Amazon (or simply use any coloured paper you have on hand) and let your children cut these rainbow hearts out by hand. So worth it for adding a splash of brightness to windows and fun to make too!

Lockdown Idea #6

Grow a windowsill garden

Just because they are cooped up inside doesn’t mean children can’t keep learning about the natural world. Inspire a love of nature by helping them grow some easy flowers and veg. To get fast results, order cornflower or pot marigold seeds online, which germinate in as little as two weeks.

Alternatively, help them grow their own salad veg by planting quick-sprouting radishes or cress. A fruit carton, cut in half, with holes in the bottom or even an old welly boot will do the trick if you don’t have any pots. 

Lockdown Idea #7

The Animal Name Game exercises both body and mind. Each player should think of an animal and tell the others a fact about it.

The other players must try and guess the animal, with a maximum of three facts per person to guess.

Players should continue until the group has cycled through five animals each, taking inspiration from the outdoors where possible. For those in a flat, let the participant use Google animal 3D to search for the animal in Google and display it in augmented reality (AR) and let the others try and work out which animal they are looking at once they provide a fact.

Lockdown Idea #8

Paper Crafts are simple and easy to make and these Moving Fish provide extra entertainment value (let the kids put on a puppet show for you afterwards to extend this activity) – older children can also help younger siblings with this activity. Watch the How To video here: https://youtu.be/UmZgsnY8fMQ

Lockdown Idea #9

A fun activity in 5 minutes! All you need is a sock, plastic bottle and a bit of washing-up liquid with water to help while away hours engaged in sensory play in the fresh air or even blow bubbles out of your flat window. Credit to #TheDadLab

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Homeschooling your child with special educational needs: pros and cons

homeschooled boy

We outline some typical pros and cons to be aware of for parents considering homeschooling their child with SEN.

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Bright Heart

Considering homeschooling your child with Special Educational Needs (SEN)? We outline the potential advantages and disadvantages…

Homeschooling your child with special educational needs: pros and cons

homeschooled boy
Homeschooling your child presents some unique opportunities and challenges

For parents considering homeschooling their child with special educational needs (SEN), we outline some typical pros and cons to be aware of.

Note that if your child attends a special school which was arranged by your local authority, you’ll need the council’s permission to homeschool your child. You do not need the council’s permission if your child attends a mainstream school, even if they have an education, health and care (EHC) plan.

Potential Advantages

1. Personalised, flexible learning

Homeschooling gives you the opportunity to create a tailor-made education for your child; one that suits his or her unique learning needs.

2. One-to-one teaching is very effective

Your homeschooled child can make more progress with less teaching time when they are supported with one-to-one teaching; a school day’s worth of learning may take place within two hours of focused teaching. A tutor is an ideal way to incorporate this support. This also applies to online tutoring if this is an option you wish to explore with your tutor.

3. Fewer distractions in a home setting

With no noise or distraction from classmates, which can sometimes negatively impact on your child’s concentration and performance, a home setting provides the distinct advantage of a focused environment

4. Application of learning into everyday life

From cooking to paying the household bills, to budgeting, and dealing with challenges, a key strength of homeschool learning is the way that children can learn to apply what they are learning to real life. With this relevance, learning takes on a whole new meaning, going from simply absorbing different pieces of information to developing fundamental skills to survive successfully in the future.

5. Freedom from peer pressure and bullying

When teaching your child at home, you don’t have to be as concerned about the harmful effects of peer pressure or the devastating effects of bullying. Your child will be assured of a safe and secure environment in which to learn and focus on growing into a happy, confident individual.

6. More organised and/or structured socialisation

Since socialisation will have to be more organised and/or structured, a home-schooled child can meet people who share their interests and hobbies rather than merely their age, and have the opportunity to get involved with a range of extra-curricular activities.

Potential Disadvantages

1. Homeschooling is a significant time commitment

Any parent leading a homeschooling education for their child with SEN will likely have to make a significant time commitment, especially if their child’s needs are more complex. The parent(s) will need to carry out a myriad of tasks. Tasks can include organising and teaching lessons, making a timetable, preparing visits, resources and field trips, joining local homeschooling groups, and making plenty of arrangements with other homeschooled children and/or extra-curricular activities for socialisation.

2. The cost

While a home education will tend to be cheaper than paying fees at a private school, parents who opt to homeschool their children will incur additional costs compared to a state school education. Parents may need to hire private tutors to help, which can be expensive, depending on the amount of tutoring required. If a parent has to give up his or her job to become a homeschool teacher, there are also high costs in terms of lost earnings.

3. Lack of teaching diversity and specialised skills

A homeschooled child will not usually have opportunities to learn from such a diverse range of skilled backgrounds as are found in a school setting, with specialist teachers and advisors. This is especially true if a child has special educational needs and requires expert teaching and care.

4. Reduced socialisation opportunities

Whilst a parent may welcome the chance to better direct their child’s interaction with other children, homeschooled children will generally have less opportunity to socialise with their peers. This does require parent’s to be proactive in making suitable arrangements to keep their homeschooled child engaged with other children.

5. Less structured routine

Attending school provides a structured routine for children, with a set timetable and school hours. A drawback of homeschooling can be this loss of routine, depending on how the homeschooling is structured.

Potential advantages and disadvantages depend to a large extent on you and your child’s unique circumstances and how you envisage providing your child with a home education. Making use of a suitably qualified tutor to complement a parent’s homeschooling efforts can make a significant difference to a child’s educational journey.

An experienced tutor will not only support you as a parent and free up some of your time, but is also a worthwhile, cost-effective investment in supporting your child with special educational needs as they learn. With the right tutor, you can enjoy the benefits of homeschooling, with less of the drawbacks. Get in touch with us today for your obligation-free consultation.

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7 ways to cope with your child’s sensory processing challenges

child with sensory processing challenges

Some children have trouble processing the information they take in through their five senses.            

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Bright Heart

Sensory processing challenges present in different ways. Here we offer 7 tips to make it easier for you and your child.

7 ways to cope with your child's sensory processing challenges

Some children have trouble processing the information they take in through their five senses. Things like too much noise, crowds and even “scratchy” clothes can cause them to become anxious, uncomfortable, overwhelmed or even aggressive. That can lead to actions that leave you mystified as a parent. Here are seven tips to help you cope.

child with sensory processing challenges

1. Understand the difference between 'mountains' and 'molehills'

As is the case with all children, not every misdemeanour by a child with sensory processing challenges ought to be punished. There are times when their actions merely stem from a need to experience something in their environment the only way they know how. For example, spitting their food out or playing with it at the table is often the best way for them to make sense of new tastes and textures. This should be treated as a proverbial molehill. Throwing a plate at someone, however, because they don’t like their food is more of a mountain and requires action on your part as the parent. The key worth bearing in mind is that if their behaviour can hurt themselves or someone else, it is recommended that you intervene. If not, rather help them work through the situation and always try to provide them with a variety of options.

2. Encourage play in a variety of sensory bins at least 5-6 times per week

Encouraging your child’s regular exposure to a variety of sensory experiences can assist him or her in overcoming or better managing their challenges. This can be done at home or under the guidance of an occupational therapist, for example, who specialises in assisting children with sensory processing difficulties.

3. Acknowledge to your child and yourself that when they experience sensory challenges, they are not simply being difficult

Acknowledge that this is a real thing that is causing them real pain or discomfort. When you do, it will give you more patience and empathy and create more ease for your child, knowing that they are accepted despite the difficulties that they feel and express

4. Yoga, breathing and meditation

Using these tools in educational settings is becoming more mainstream and with good reason.  Moving slowly through a yoga sequence can provide calming stimulation to the vestibular system, the proprioceptive system, and the tactile system, improving self-regulation for a child with sensory processing challenges. Meditation helps calm the sympathetic nervous system (fight or flight) while activating the parasympathetic nervous system (resting and digesting).

5. When dealing with aggression related to sensory processing challenges, remember it’s not because of bad parenting

It’s not your fault. The most important thing you can do is have a team of people to help, from a trusted family doctor, to an occupational therapist that you trust. Believe that it gets better. Remind yourself how much you absolutely love your child and pick yourself up to fight another day, because your child desperately needs you to.

6. Create a chill-out zone for emotional times

Keep this space calm, clutter-free, quiet and dim. Some children might favour a bottom bunk, the corner of a closet, even under a desk or table. You could even use a child-sized tent or teepee for younger children. Items you may wish to include in this calming zone include: favourite books, noise-cancelling headphones, sensory toys, a beanbag chair and/or weighted blanket. The most important factor to note here is that the chill-out zone must remain a place of refuge for your child, not a place of punishment.

7. Create as much consistency and predictability in their daily routine as possible.

Look for patterns. Use check-lists for your child as a visual cue to create routine and give them a sense of knowing what to expect. Certain times of day are often more challenging than others. Break down a situation or routine (for example a homework plan) into simple tasks on a whiteboard. This can help prevent your child from becoming overwhelmed.

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Is your child ready for their GCSE exams?

exam revision

Good planning and structure can reduce exam anxiety with GCSEs fast approaching.                                                          

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Bright Heart

Preparing for GCSE exams need not be an anxious time with appropriate planning and structure.

Is your child ready for their GCSE exams?

It can be scary how quickly the year flies by, with the days already feeling longer as we approach summer.

 

For many children, GCSE exams are fast approaching. With only a few months to go before exams start in May, it is important that students have a revision plan in place. Asking for help is not a sign of weakness. Instead, helping your child find the tools to become self-sufficient in their learning is a sensible approach.

exam revision
While GCSE revision can appear daunting, it can be more easily achieved with a structured plan.

At Bright Heart, our experienced and trained tutors can design bespoke plans to give your child all the necessary tools to create structured study timetables and adopt a good work ethic. Our more nurturing approach to tuition is also sensitive to their emotional well-being.

Our tutors cover a variety of subjects (in addition to English, Maths and Science) for many different students; ranging from students in school just looking for a little help and encouragement, to children who are homeschooled or who have special educational needs (SEN). With one-to-one tuition beneficial to students of all abilities, we can help your child realise their potential. Year 11 students who receive this level of personalised tuition tend to perform better in class and also retain more information.

teenager prepared for GCSE exams
Revision is a work habit that can be learned and which eases anxiety.

GCSEs can be an anxious time for students and parents alike. An integral part of our heart-based tuition involves preparing our students emotionally for facing exams. This can be a hugely stressful time for 15 and 16-year-olds. Bright Heart’s nurturing approach helps to build confidence and self-esteem so our pupils can tackle the exams with reduced levels of stress. Our blend of structured planning, tailored tuition and self-development through embodying a holistic approach provides our students the tools needed to achieve longer-term success.

Your child can benefit from your encouragement and understanding as well as the support of a patient tutor at this often anxious time.

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” – Nelson Mandela

Get in touch to discuss how Bright Heart’s unique heart-based approach can help your child with their GCSE preparation.

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Holiday tips for parents of a child with SEN

the festive season with families

Help keep the whole family happy during the festive season with these practical tips.                                                           

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Bright Heart

The festive season can bring many expectations. We look at how to keep smiling and enjoy this time with your children.

Holiday Tips for Parents of a Child with SEN

Christmas crowds, lights, smells and lack of routine can make the holidays a challenging time for children with special educational needs. Help keep the whole family happy during the festivities with these practical tips on how to survive it with your sense of humour and festive cheer intact.

the festive season with families
Holidays can be stressful, but they're also the perfect time of year to reflect and celebrate small victories.

1. If you're travelling

Travelling with a child with additional needs at any time of year can be difficult. Holiday travel can be even more stressful. A few ways to make journeys easier for children with SEN include:

Make a list of your child’s favourite toys and accessories on which to rely for a Special Educational Needs Holiday Toolkit. This may include noise cancelling headphones, sensory toys such as fidget spinners, weighted toys (especially for children with sensory processing challenges) and any other particular favourite toys.  It’s also advisable to travel with a supply of your child’s favourite foods and snacks in order to overcome any unexpected food challenges.  You may find a tablet or personal gaming device handy for limited screen time as well.

2. Visit the local library

While it may not sound like the most exciting place for a holiday outing, for children with special educational needs, the quiet and less crowded library makes for a great option where you can spend a few hours together. At some libraries you may even find games which are appropriate for your child. 

3. Stay home and get crafty

Stay home and bake cookies, make paper garlands, cut snowflakes, or otherwise have crafty fun with your child. If you need to do most of the work, that’s ok. We suggest a number of projects that can be completed in a few hours with minimal fuss – scroll through our Facebook or Instagram pages for ideas. 

This is also an important way to not only connect with your child at this special time of year, but also to keep them occupied in a stimulating way that inspires confidence and feelings of success and accomplishment. These exercises are a tool for helping your child stay mentally engaged during the time off from school and tutoring.

4. Worry less about age-appropriate experiences

Many children with special educational needs are “younger than their years.”  A 12-year-old with special educational needs may for example, still get a big kick out of holiday-themed Thomas the Tank Engine toys or a visit with Santa.

Consider choosing a few toys and experiences that will resonate with your child even if they’re really intended for younger children. After all, many adults still love watching Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and How the Grinch Stole Christmas

5. Communicate expectations

Communication is a big factor in successful holiday survival with a child with special educational needs. Communicate with your child what will be happening during their holiday so that they feel secure and prepared.

Share with the family and friends you may be visiting what your needs are. For example, let them know if your child needs downtime and may not be able to participate in some of the usual family activities. Communicate with them ahead of time if your child can only tolerate a certain amount of time at a gathering. Let them know you may need to retreat to your room or back to your hotel and may miss part of the celebration.

If you are travelling as a family or entertaining during the holidays, communicate with your partner or spouse what the plan and expectations are. Will you stay for an allotted time and leave at that time regardless? Or do you prefer to watch for those signs special needs parents recognise that it might be time to go (or wind down a party)?

6. Be gentle with yourself and your child

It’s normal to feel frustrated when a child with special educational needs doesn’t seem to “get” the holidays or appreciate what you do to make the season special. It can be equally difficult to endure the stares and comments of well-meaning family and friends who simply might not understand why your child isn’t appropriately happy and engaged.

Whilst you cannot change the behaviour or feelings of other people, you can change your own.

To make the holidays easier for everyone (including you):

·         Remember that the holidays aren’t for garnering praise or appreciation; they’re for building relationships and memories (and, for some people, for remembering the religious significance of Christmas). If you’re able to remember even a few special moments when the holidays are done, you’ve succeeded.

·         Give yourself permission to walk away from difficult situations. While some extended families and friends can be wonderful with children with special educational needs, others…aren’t. If your family falls into the latter category, it’s ok to cut a visit short. You’re under no obligation to stick with an unpleasant situation.

·         Get support when you need it. Maybe you really need to attend a carols evening, a church service, or a special party even if your child can’t or won’t. There’s nothing wrong with asking for a little respite care from those in your support network so that you can have the experience that you need in order to recharge and remember why the holidays are special.

 

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Does my child with ADHD need a tutor?

Find out if your child with ADHD needs a tutor

This October is ADHD Awareness month. We consider how tutoring could help your child with ADHD.          

Bright Heart

Bright Heart

This October is ADHD Awareness month. We consider how tutoring may help your child with ADHD who is falling behind with schoolwork.

Does my child with ADHD need a tutor?

If your child has been diagnosed with ADHD then you’re most likely familiar with the struggles he or she has experienced in keeping up with schoolwork. In fact, for a child with ADHD, falling behind with their schoolwork can feel a bit like chasing a train that has left the station: they might feel inclined to want to simply give up and go home.  Parents who tune into their child’s needs early by enlisting the support of a trusted one-to-one tutor, for example, make it easier for their child with ADHD to ‘hop back on board’.   

Find out if your child with ADHD needs a tutor
Find out if your child with ADHD could benefit from having a tutor

Why tutoring you may ask?  

Students with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) or ADD,  may have difficulty with, among other things: 

  • getting and staying organised
  • following directions
  • managing emotions
  • managing time
  • shifting focus from one thing to another
  • getting started on tasks
  • focusing on what’s important
  • being motivated and confident with schoolwork

One-to-one tutoring provides the much-needed individual attention and individualised approach to learning that will assist your child in these areas and help them perform optimally. 

How can you tell if your child needs extra help with schoolwork?  

Some signs to look out for include:

  • His or her homework is frequently incomplete or inaccurate, no matter how much time he or she spends on it.
  • He or she is working hard, but their marks continue to drop.
  • He or she shows an increasing lack of confidence and motivation.
  • He or she is anxious before tests.
  • He or she is often reluctant to go to school.
  • He or she seems to have lost interest in learning. The teacher reports that his or her behaviour has begun causing problems in class.
  • He or she says, “I’ll never understand this. I give up.” Or worse, you hear yourself saying it.

What will a Bright Heart tutor do differently to assist my child with ADHD?

At Bright Heart we approach tutoring a little differently. We aim to create a nurturing relationship between your child and the tutor where the student feels secure and supported. Each student receives tuition tailored to their unique requirements and learning styles, since no two children are the same.

It is our approach that provides us with the ability to foster a strong personal relationship with each student which in turn creates a space where our tutors can identify any additional learning accommodations that will further promote your child’s success. 

One of the known challenges of one-to-one tutoring is finding a good match for your child. This is where Bright Heart does the heavy lifting for you:  our free consultation session will help us understand your child’s unique needs and gain an understanding of his or her learning preferences in order to properly match them with an appropriate tutor. Our free trial lesson will allow the tutor to build rapport with your child with no obligation to proceed unless you are entirely happy.

Making a difference - how our tutors approach students with ADHD

In addition to carefully selecting its tutors, Bright Heart provides its tutors with SEN training from nasen to help them suitably prepare for working with all students.

When dealing with students with ADHD, Bright Heart tutors can provide written notes as well as giving instructions verbally. We like our tutors to place an emphasis on eye contact during verbal instruction (only if comfortable to the student) and to break work down into manageable pieces. When working with a child with ADHD, Bright Heart tutors will avoid distracting stimuli in the learning environment and seek to present information in different ways e.g. using pictures or diagrams. Our tutors will aim to test knowledge, not attention.

Get in touch today to start your Bright Heart journey and discover our heart-based tuition.

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5 benefits to homeschooling your child

homeschooling a girl

In this post we look at some of the many benefits of homeschooling, especially when considering a private tutor.

Bright Heart

Bright Heart

In this post we look at some of the many benefits of homeschooling, particularly when complemented by a carefully trained and matched tutor

5 Benefits to Homeschooling your Child

homeschooling a girl

The new school year is upon us and you may be considering homeschooling for your child. Perhaps you have a child with special educational needs (SEN) who is not getting the support at school they need? While traditional schooling has definite merit and homeschooling does present certain challenges, in this blog, we consider some of the many benefits of homeschooling (especially when complemented by a carefully selected home tutor). 

 

1. Less Distraction

In a classroom environment, it may sometimes be difficult to ignore the distractions that occur from the visual, noise and movement stimulation of sharing a room with two dozen or more other students. This might impact on your child’s ability to concentrate and process or absorb information. Compared with the focus that a homeschooling setting brings, along with the added benefit of a private tutor and you can understand why it may be more conducive to learning effectively. This is particularly important for learners with certain special educational needs. 

2. Tailored Learning Pace

Every child develops and learns at his or her own unique pace. Some require more time to solidify certain skills or concepts than others. Often a classroom environment is catering to the needs of  the whole rather than of the individual; the group is expected to cover a certain amount of work within a given curriculum during a specific time frame and this takes precedence over individual needs. This is despite the best intentions from the most caring of educators. Students with special educational needs will especially benefit more from an environment in which they can learn at their own pace. 

3. Freedom to Ask More Questions

Students sometimes hold back or refrain from asking questions in a group setting for fear of losing face or embarrassing themselves in front of their peers. Homeschoolers are given the freedom to ask (and keep asking!) until they understand. A private tutor or parent is much less likely to say, “That is off topic,” or “That is not what we are learning about today,” compared to a busy teacher.

4. One-to-one Attention

With an individual tutor or parent, sitting in a quiet room, with not much else to focus on besides the work they are doing, it can be easier for a student to process what they are learning. Tutors get to know your child’s individual learning style and can adapt teaching methods accordingly. They act as your child’s own private teacher. In this setting, your child receives an individualised learning experience that he or she won’t always get in a classroom. Tutors can customise the lessons and activities specifically for your child. This is also possible for when tutors provide online tuition for homeschooled children.

5. Improved Work and Study Habits

Besides helping to foster an improved attitude towards learning and helping your child prepare better for tests and examinations, students in the homeschool environment can also learn work and study habits that will stand them in good stead for life. These skills can help prepare your child to successfully achieve his or her goals both in and outside of their educational environment. Your child can gain the ability to do school work on his or her own, without your help and can realize his or her own personal growth as they take more responsibility for their studies. This in turn provides a monumental sense of achievement and increased self-esteem. 

How Can Tutoring Help?

Perhaps you are already homeschooling your child and are simply weighing up the benefits of tutoring to get more out of homeschooling? 

Enlisting the help of a carefully matched and trained tutor, who understands your child’s unique needs and learning style, can enhance some of the homeschooling advantages discussed above.

If you’d like to explore the benefits of tutoring for your homeschooled Child, take advantage of an obligation-free consultation with one of our directors, who can assist in guiding you towards the ideal match for your child in terms of personality as well as educational needs. Experience the Bright Heart Approach today!


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